Interracial dating discrimination

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The exclusion of races dissimilar to one's own is a main feature of sexual racism, however a reluctance to date inter-racially predominantly spans from the discriminatory views often possessed by those in society, as opposed to purely a same-race individual preference.

Moreover, this racial discrimination also deviates into the form of the sexual dehumanisation of individuals of other racial identities.

Last week Rachel Kolisi, the wife of Springbok player Siya Kolisi, opened up about the racism and discrimination she and her husband face because of their interracial relationship.

Rachel took to social media to share some of the horrific messages she gets from online trolls, and initially stated that she wanted to make her accounts private because of the hate.

These non-English terms for "race-mixing" are not considered as offensive as "miscegenation", although they have historically been tied to the caste system (Casta) that was established during the colonial era in Spanish-speaking Latin America.

Some groups in South America, however, consider the use of the word mestizo offensive because it was used during the times of the colony to refer specifically to the mixing between the conquistadores and the indigenous people.

In 1968, 73% of US citizens disapproved of the right to marry inter-racially, whereas this figure dropped to 17% by 2007, this illustrating the reduction in discriminatory attitudes towards interracial dating.

Irrespective of this, there still remains the issue of sexual racism in the online dating world, in that preferences appear to follow a racial hierarchy.

Rachel and Siya are by no means alone in their experience of hateful commentary and discrimination.

The origins of sexual racism can be explained by looking at its history, especially in the USA, where the abolition of slavery and the Reconstruction Era had significant impacts on interracial mixing.

Attitudes towards interracial relationships, and indeed marriage, have increased in positivity in the last 50 years.

These words, much older than the term miscegenation, are derived from the Late Latin mixticius for "mixed", which is also the root of the Spanish word mestizo.

Portuguese also uses miscigenação, derived from the same Latin root as the English word.

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